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drew

Beth,

As I am sure you know, Andy Goodman is a master story teller that works with many nonprofits. He did a wonderful project for Friends of the Children a couple years back in my fair city. http://www.friendsofthechildren.org/portland/

Andy also does workshops around the country from time to time that I would highly recommend. http://www.agoodmanonline.com

drew

Beth,

As I am sure you know, Andy Goodman is a master story teller that works with many nonprofits. He did a wonderful project for Friends of the Children a couple years back in my fair city. http://www.friendsofthechildren.org/portland/

Andy also does workshops around the country from time to time that I would highly recommend. http://www.agoodmanonline.com

drew

Beth,

As I am sure you know, Andy Goodman is a master story teller that works with many nonprofits. He did a wonderful project for Friends of the Children a couple years back in my fair city. http://www.friendsofthechildren.org/portland/

Andy also does workshops around the country from time to time that I would highly recommend. http://www.agoodmanonline.com

krash63

We use storytelling in several aspects of the organization as a communication strategy to engage with employees, donors, patients, etc. It makes sense to evolve it as our social media strategy evolves.

The hardest part in being an engaging story teller is you have to meet the recipients of the story at their interest level, not what YOU want them to hear.

Listen first, then develop your story.

One of the best storytelling lessons is to listen or read great short story authors. Take what they do and modify it to your situation.

Rachel Happe

Hi Beth -

This is a fantastic point - for me I am almost to the point where I think storytelling is the *only* way we should share information, if at all possible. Here's why. Humans remember and act on things that are emotionally relevant to them and the only way to make information emotional is by wrapping it up in a story. In the non-profit world there are fewer levers to influence your constituents so the emotional attachment is at the core of how you attract attention/funding/resources.

Scarlett Swerdlow

I attended a seminar today on developing and delivering on your organization's brand. I like to think of brand as a collection of your organization's stories and icons: the total of experiences a person has with your organization.

Stories are important to nonprofits because stories are your brand, your reputation. Stories are what people remember. Stories live in the minds of your constituents.

Stories are also a way to communicate your past while ushering in the future. A story explains why you have the vision you do, how you came to it.

I love the Blood and Milk post you link to in the wiki because it drives home the point that social media allows nonprofits with small budgets but rich histories to tell their amazing stories.

Lynn Fillmore

Different people react to different things. For many storytelling gives them a picture in their mind that they can remember. It brings a real face to the problems that we work with. That is what strikes a chord with people that have a more emotional side. Others need facts and numbers. They need it to make logical sense. To reach both types at the same time, the facts and numbers have to be woven into the story or presented in two different forms.

Steve Griffiths

Humans are made to be emotional beings and our history is formed by oral tradition so we are predisposed to relate in storytelling. People are moved and envision a story in their own way through empathy and/or sympathy for the characters in a story. That is what moves people to action. While we can't throw away numbers as they tell another piece of the story. Numbers, by themselves, don't move people.

The importance of storytelling for the individual is to identify a story that touches you and craft it so when you tell the story it is authentic and sounds like something you would say. It needs to be short, emotional and able to paint a mind-picture for the listener.

As for social media, I've never tried this, but I wonder how effective a two-part story would be. The first part just being a picture that represents your story with the second part being the narrative that enhances the picture and completes the story for the audience.

Chad Brown

AUTHENTIC storytelling is the emotional hook and is the reason people act. The numbers rationalize the person's decision to act based upon their emotional decision based upon the story.

The challenge in using storytelling in fundraising is for it to be honest, authentic and true. Donors will read right through a "phoney" story and can sense when they are being "sold".

susan

Effective storytelling/gathering relies heavily on a good set of ears and as Chad said, an honest approach. It has been my experience that the amount of time invested and the level of intimacy regarding the subject matter will eventually bring the story to life (or not). Emotional relevance must be perceived by the writer before it can be passed on to the listener. It helps, I think to engage the reader through the use of language that doesn't turn instantly to white noise. Over time I've moved from purely a visual approach to writing stories, to (lately) letting the subject tell their own story or some part of it, with audio and photos. While that particular approach pleases me the most, I can't really speak for its effectiveness with regard to donors.

Beth Kanter

What does phoney story telling look like? Have examples?

Alanna

I think phony storytelling happens when you start wiht a narrative and look for facts, pictures, and emotional impact to support the narrative you've already chosen. People can sense when things don't hang together right. You need to look at your whole situation, and then find your story in it.

Alanna

I think that this article: http://www.cnn.com/2008/LIVING/04/10/heroes.vaughn/index.html is an example of phony storytelling. CNN wanted an individual hero with an easily understood story, so they just took what they wanted from her life.

If you dig into it, though, the story is actually much more compelling and believable.I blogged about it a little bit: http://alannashaikh.blogspot.com/2008/04/ten-thousand-girls.html

rahulk

i have gone your site.and I knew about different think It brings a real face to the problems that we work with

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rahulk

Arizona Treatment Centers

rahulk

i have gone your site.and I knew about different think It brings a real face to the problems that we work with

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

rahulk

Arizona Treatment Centers

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