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« Marketers Are Getting Results With Social Media | Main | Social Media Behind the Firewall: The Tire, Tower, or Hub and Spoke? »

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Scott Meis

A very hot topic with a wealth of great information here. This issue is only going to become more important as companies and organizations actively integrate social media into everyday communications. It's crucial that steps are taken now to think about how best to educate employees and communicate an organization's online presence and mission. It's a fine line balance between comfort of brand/message control without constraining or creating a policy that confines otherwise healthy online dialogue and activity by employees.

Stacy Monaghan

This has been a topic that has come up a lot as we are finally branching out into the social networking world.

There has been some resistance about the concept of "two-way" communications and the thought of personal and professional worlds colliding. I have thought about creating a policy, or at least some guidelines, in an effort to help those who are skeptical and not familiar with Twitter, Facebook, etc. feel as though there are some rules in place.

Personally, I agree with the "don't say anything on Twitter that would embarrass my mother" policy.

Sacha Chua

Thanks for the link, and for that great post! Some people have also found my mindmap of social media guideline issues handy. =)

Sacha Chua

Thanks for the link, and for that great post! Some people have also found my mindmap of social media guideline issues handy. =)

Account Deleted

Beth:
Thanks for the link to the Air Force post I did. Your readers may also be interested in this compendium on the Altimeter Wiki of social media policies. http://wiki.altimetergroup.com/page/Social+Media+Policies

Dana

Adam Green

Before you can institute a social media policy, you have to raise the entire organization's social media literacy. Tools like Facebook, Twitter, and Friendfeed can be too big a step for "normal" computer users who are comfortable with email and web pages. The digital divide between Web 2.0 users and the majority of people who use Web 1.0 technology is much larger than most people realize. Google Alerts are a good transition tool, especially if someone can set up a set of standard alerts that the whole organization can read. This can be done by directing them to a mailing list that can be joined by everyone, or taking the alerts feed and posting it on a blog page. Once people see how many interesting conversations are going on that relate to their work, they'll be more interested in using Web 2.0 tools to join the conversation. I've written a free Google Alerts tutorial that can help new users get more of this great without having to be a database expert:

http://www.alertrank.com/google-alerts-tutorial.html

I hope your readers find it useful.

rebeccahappy

This is a great article that covers a lot of the conversations going on and not going on in my org at the moment.I will certainly come back and read all the links you put in to get a deeper scope.
Knowing where to start to address these issues keeps a lot of people from diving in. In the end it happens in spite of the gate keepers but with no consistency of strategy or message.
I love the list you posted on the existing behaviors that are main concerns with or without SM. Underlining this point should collapse the justification of fear from the start.
I will certainly pass this article on more than once.

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