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David Alston

Great list Beth, having this type of post provides a great how-to guide to get started with listening right away. Thanks for the link out to the Top 10 Reasons post. Hope it is helpful for your readers. Cheers. David

Kobie

Good post. Like 'Cheers' - where everyone knows your name.

What is the complaint about big companies and government - they don't hear me. What do we like about small local shops - they know and cator to me.

Philosophy. Paint is sold by many Home depot, Lows, SEARS, Wal*Mart, local hard ware store, etc. So why pick one over the other when they sell the same item? Service. People want someone to help. Here products are not the answer - it is listening and hearing.

Same for a disaster. The government, that big thing in the city of monumnets, started listening and accepting emails. Well one department called HHS did. People where civil, helpful and attentive.

Good comment.
Kobie
www.newfluwiki2.com
"A wise man has long ears, big eyes and a small mouth" - Russian proverb

Walter

Beth,

I have a question about listening with free tools in a nonprofit environment. Should employees charged with listening for an organization be using their own personal accounts to do so? For instance, if I am going to be using Google Reader to listen, should I have a separate Google account set up for this purpose? Or is it OK to use my personal account for work-related feeds as well as feeds set up for my own interest?

Ari Herzog

This is great advice for a full-time organization, but what about part-time ones? What about the organizations staffed by volunteers and which exist to further a mission of ideas?

For instance, the local Rotary Club can follow your above advice; the local high school PTO is more fluid and may not have the time or resources, unless individual members/officers choose to do it.

How do you tell the PTO act like the Rotary Club?

Beth Kanter

This advice is for any organization regardless of size that wants its listening to be effective. You have to understand why you are listening and what decisions you'll link it to.

In terms of time, you can get started using these tools - searching on your organization's name - and spending less than half hour day once your system is set up and you can do the work flow
http://www.wearemedia.org/Tool+Box+Monitoring+and+Tracking

Adam

Setting up a way to monitor and measure feedback is essential for success with social media. In my experience, organizations that have their own social media and social networks setup can interact directly with members to elicit feedback.

To monitor other social media, it's always a great idea to use free tools such as Twitter keyword monitoring or Techrigy's SM2.

kristen williams

hi im kristen williams i have an orginization called A PLACE IN THE SON i can never get any one to donate ,clothes or any thing if you are reading this blog please email.ktwilliams97@gmail.com,or call (919)359-0345]or (919)271-8549 any donations are accepted.We are looking for any thing for people who do not have any thing


thank you:kristen williams

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