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Laura Howe

Thanks for highlighting this topic. I work for the Red Cross too. Being able to have our staff access social media has given so many people the opportunity to learn new skills and expand our voice in the online world. It's also given our leadership a chance to really understand what we are doing. If you work in a place that is restricting social media access, it's important to become an advocate and make a responsible, logical case for its use. On a side note-I'm Wendy's boss. You couldn't have picked a better person to interview. She has done wonders for our organization (including teaching little ol techno-phobe me how to be a champion for social media!).

Aaron Stiner

I think the conclusion of this article offers some great advice - start small, experiment and evaluate. Not every organization can afford a social media strategist, but every organization can afford to pilot a Facebook or blog giving program. These are great programs to give to young professionals in your organization. They are already in touch and using these medium heavily. Let them use some of the time they already spend using online social media to promote your organization.

At Valley of the Sun United Way, all our staff are encouraged to join Facebook and talk about our work as part of our daily comments and conversations. It's easy to do, it's driven by the person and the person's passions and it builds on our work.

Aaron Stiner

I think the conclusion of this article offers some great advice - start small, experiment and evaluate. Not every organization can afford a social media strategist, but every organization can afford to pilot a Facebook or blog giving program. These are great programs to give to young professionals in your organization. They are already in touch and using these medium heavily. Let them use some of the time they already spend using online social media to promote your organization.

At Valley of the Sun United Way, all our staff are encouraged to join Facebook and talk about our work as part of our daily comments and conversations. It's easy to do, it's driven by the person and the person's passions and it builds on our work.

LaDonna Coy

This is a great interview and timely post for so many of us who are working with government and nonprofit networks. Those I've had the privilege to work with have blocked all social media - to the degree that even video used for web-based training is blocked. All popular sites like Facebook, YouTube and Flickr are out-of-the-question.

My advice to them has been to partner with the IT department and begin with a small project that can be readily evaluated. :o) Most of them need to tip-toe in with a small project, kind of a "proof of concept" before they can even begin to get support for any kind of full-fledged social media strategy. I'm encouraged by Wendy's experience and positive outcome. Thank you both.

mrobiul kane

forgone cost of the opportunity is opportunity cost

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