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Donnie Peterson

It seems to me that if we are leasing a house, we go out and get a standard legal form and then add, edit or omit as we see fit. Rather than re-invent the wheel, a Social Networking Policy can be generalized to function across many cultures and contexts too. There are some other items that might go on my policy, but i think in general this version is fine. Plus, I can't imagine waiting 6 months to implement something so presently needed.

That being said, if you are a believer in Socio-Cognitive Learning theory, discussion is ALWAYS important. Discussing IS learning; and that is a quality of existence and benefit we ought not ever compromise; especially if it can lead to assuaging fears that arise when orgs adopt new technologies.

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